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Welcome to Resource of the Month, featuring books or other resources that have been recommended by some of our occupational therapist or physical therapist staff members. As we build our archive, be sure to check out some of the resources that were recommended in past months. Enjoy! 
 

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 Resources for Months Past:   
 
 October 2017
 
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Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder
By Scott Tomchek, PhD, OT/L, FAOTA, and Kristie Patten Koenig, PhD, OT/L, FAOTA
Recommended by AC - HCDE
 
The most recent Centers for Disease Control and prevention data on the prevalence of autism in the United States identified 1 in 68 children (1 in 42 boys, 1 in 189 girls) as having ASD (autism spectrum disorder), and it has been estimated that more than 3.5 million people in the United States live with ASD.
 
This Practice Guideline provides an overview of the evidence for occupational therapy to assist people with ASD in achieving health, well-being, and participation in life through engagement in occupations. It explains the occupational therapy process for this population, defines the domain, and describes interventions that occur within acceptable practice. Extensive attention is given to sensory, psychosocial, and family issues. Appendixes include searchable evidence tables on a flash drive for ease of use.
 
Also, check out the Featured Article about this book and Social Narratives:
 
 
 
September 2017
Special Edition
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This month TxSpot features a Special Edition Resource of the Month in response to the devastating effects of Hurricane Harvey. The following are links to resources that can help with questions school-based therapists and other school personnel may have regarding unique situations created by Hurricane Harvey which affect special education and our students with disabilities.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

  

July 2017
 
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No Ordinary Move
 
by Linda Bidabe with Chris Voll
Recommended by AC and JC – HCDE
No Ordinary Move is the riveting memoir of Linda Bidabe, the founder and author of the MOVE (Mobility Opportunities Via Education) Program and Curriculum. Linda is an innovative educator with over thirty years of experience working with children with disabilities. She takes the reader through her hardscrabble childhood on a Kansas farm, the self-loathing of adolescence, the heartbreak of divorce and the trials of single parenthood and haunting memories of "too many small white coffins" of children with severe disabilities who, she was sure, could have been saved. Driven by a fierce loyalty for those in her care, an insatiable questioning of “conventional wisdom” and the conviction that all of us deserve a chance to live before we die, Linda swore to help each child fulfill his or her greatest aspiration. “Our business is to discover the dream in each child, and to believe in it until it becomes a reality.” From the rubble of her own painful life experiences, she built the revolutionary approach to overcoming obstacles that has made her a hero around the world.
“Inspiring” and “very gratifying,” No Ordinary Move is no ordinary memoir.
 
 
 
May 2017
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Ghost Boy
by Martin Pistorius
Recommended by SB – Katy ISD
They all thought he was gone. But he was alive and trapped inside his own body for ten years. In January 1988 Martin Pistorius, age twelve, fell inexplicably sick. First, he lost his voice and stopped eating. Then he slept constantly and shunned human contact. Doctors were mystified. Within eighteen months he was mute and wheelchair bound. Martin's parents were told an unknown degenerative disease left him with the mind of a baby and less than two years to live. Martin was moved to care centers for severely disabled children. The stress and heartache shook his parents' marriage and their family to the core. Their boy was gone. Or so they thought. Ghost Boy is the heart-wrenching story of one boy's return to life through the power of love and faith. In these pages, readers see a parent's resilience, the consequences of misdiagnosis, abuse at the hands of cruel caretakers, and the unthinkable duration of Martin's mental alertness betrayed by his lifeless body. We also see a life reclaimed, a business created, a new love kindled - all from a wheelchair. Martin's emergence from his own darkness invites us to celebrate our own lives and fight for a better life for others.
 
 

April 2017

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Autism Spectrum Disorder Podcasts

By AOTA
  
April's recommended resource is not a book, but a set of podcasts on Autism Spectrum Disorder produced by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Enhance your school-based practice by listening to those that interest you. recommended resource is not a book, but a set of podcasts on Autism Spectrum Disorder produced by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Enhance your school-based practice by listening.recommended resource is not a book, but a set of podcasts on Autism Spectrum Disorder produced by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Enhance your school-based practice by listening to those that interest you. recommended resource is not a book, but a set of podcasts on Autism Spectrum Disorder produced by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Enhance your school-based practice by listening.

Autism Awareness podcast

 Autism FAQs podcast

 Autism Spectrum Disorder Mealtime podcast 1

 

 

 March 2017

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 The Occupational Therapist’s Handbook for Inclusive School Practices

By Julie Causton, PhD
Recommended by CB, Katy ISD
 
This is the friendly, down-to-earth survival guide OTs need to deliver their important services effectively as part of an inclusive school team. Packed with practical guidance and tips, examples that relate directly to an OT's daily practice, and first-person insights from seasoned OTs, this guidebook is key to helping students develop new skills in key areas, from motor skills and mobility to academic achievement and friendships. All new OTs should read this book before their first day in an inclusive school—and veteran OTs will find it invaluable for ensuring that supports are delivered in the least restrictive environment.

 

                                                                              January 2017 

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Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight: What to Do If You Are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World
 
By Sharon Heller 
Recommended by DA, Spring ISD
 
This prescriptive book by a developmental psychologist and sufferer of Sensory Defensive Disorder (SD) sheds light on a little known but common affliction in which sufferers react to harmless stimuli as irritating, distracting or dangerous. 
 
We all know what it feels like to be irritated by loud music, accosted by lights that are too bright, or overwhelmed by a world that moves too quickly. But millions of people suffer from Sensory Defensive Disorder (SD), a common affliction in which people react to harmless stimuli not just as a distracting hindrance, but a potentially dangerous threat. Sharon Heller, Ph.D. is not only a trained psychologist, she is sensory defensive herself. Bringing both personal and professional perspectives, Dr. Heller is the ideal person to tell the world about this problem that will only increase as technology and processed environments take over our lives. In addition to heightening public awareness of this prevalent issue, Dr. Heller provides tools and therapies for alleviating and, in some cases, even eliminating defensiveness altogether.
  
December 2016
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 Something fun just in time for the holidays!
The Book with No Pictures  
By BJ Novak 
Recommended by CD, Spring ISD
 

(A silly book for adults to read to children) -- A #1 New York Times bestseller, this innovative and wildly funny read-aloud by award-winning humorist/actor B.J. Novak will turn any reader into a comedian. You might think a book with no pictures seems boring and serious. Except . . . here’s how this book works. Everything written on the page has to be said by the person reading it aloud. Even if the words say . . .  BLORK. Or BLUURF.   Even if the words are a preposterous song about eating ants for breakfast, or just a list of astonishingly goofy sounds like BLAGGITY BLAGGITY and GLIBBITY GLOBBITY.

 

Cleverly irreverent and irresistibly silly, The Book with No Pictures is one that kids will beg to hear again and again. (And parents will be happy to oblige.)  

     
          October 2016 
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Out of My Mind
By Sharon M. Draper
Recommended by LH, Katy ISD
Synopsis:
From award-winning author Sharon Draper comes Out of My Mind, the story of a brilliant girl who cannot speak or write.  “If there is one book teens and parents (and everyone else) should read this year, Out of My Mind should be it” (Denver Post). 
 
Melody is not like most people. She cannot walk or talk, but she has a photographic memory; she can remember every detail of everything she has ever experienced. She is smarter than most of the adults who try to diagnose her and smarter than her classmates in her integrated classroom—the very same classmates who dismiss her as mentally challenged, because she cannot tell them otherwise. But Melody refuses to be defined by cerebral palsy. And she’s determined to let everyone know it…somehow.
 
In this breakthrough story—reminiscent of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly—from multiple Coretta Scott King Award-winner Sharon Draper, readers will come to know a brilliant mind and a brave spirit who will change forever how they look at anyone   with a disability.                                                                 
 
 
            September 2016 
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Building Sensory Friendly Classrooms: Implementing Data-Driven Strategies

 by Rebecca a Moyes

Recommended by CB, Katy ISD
Synopsis: 
Rebecca Moyes, a teacher, author, renowned lecturer, and mother of a child with Asperger's Syndrome, helps walk any regular education or special education teacher through the process of setting up a sensory-friendly classroom in this easy to use book.
 
 This is currently the only book that discusses the importance of data-driven strategies, and then helps teachers implement them!  Sensory integration disorder often presents as a behavioral problem; thus, although it’s an internal state, it has to be addressed based on what observable behaviors are seen in the child.  Rebecca is able to take the data and work out how to make any student's, (and teacher's!), life easier.
 
  
August 2016

 THE REASON I JUMP: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen-Year-Old Boy with Autism
By Naoki Higashida
Recommended by PS, OTR, Katy ISD
 
Synopsis:
Written by Naoki Higashida, a very smart, very self-aware, and very charming thirteen-year-old boy with autism, it is a one-of-a-kind memoir that demonstrates how an autistic mind thinks, feels, perceives, and responds in ways few of us can imagine. Parents and family members who never thought they could get inside the head of their autistic loved one at last have a way to break through to the curious, subtle, and complex life within. 
 
July 2016
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Just Take a Bite

by Lori Ernsperger and Tania Stegen-Hanson

Recommended by WL, OTR, Katy Independent School District

Synopsis:

"Just Take a Bite" takes parents and professionals step by step through the myths about eating to the complexity of eating itself, which leads to an understanding of physical, neurological and/or psychological reason why children may not be eating as they should.

Helpful chapters include:

·         Who Are Resistant Eaters?

·         Oral-Motor Development

·         Environmental and Behavioral Factors Contributing to Problems with Eating

·         Sensory-Based and Motor-Based Problems Affecting the Resistant Eater

·         Motor-Based Eating Problems vs. Sensory-Based Eating Problems

·         Designing and Implementing a Comprehensive Treatment Plan

·         Environmental Controls

·         Gastrointestinal, Physical and Oral-Motor Development

·         Stages of Sensory Development for Eating  

·         A Recipe for Success

 
 
June 2016
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Best Practices for Occupational Therapy in Schools
by Gloria Frolek Clark
Recommended by TF, OTR, Spring Independent School District

Synopsis: 
 
Nearly 22% of school occupational therapy practitioners work in school settings, creating demand for current, effective, and evidence-based best practices for students. Reflecting the extensiveness of occupational therapy practice in schools, this exciting publication contains best practices from preschool to postsecondary transitions, from ADLs to driving.
 
Highlights include
·     Section I. Foundations of School Practice
·     Section II. Evidence-Guided Practices: Systems-Level Considerations to Support Participation
·     Section III. Evidence-Guided Practices: Population-Based Planning to Support Participation
·     Section IV. Evidence-Guided Practices: Performance-Based Considerations to Enhance Student 
                          Participation
·     Section V. Evidence-Guided Practices: Activity-Based Considerations to Enhance Student Participation
 
With a deliberate focus on student participation, Best Practices for Occupational Therapy in Schools provides practical applications of evidence-based research to daily practice. This comprehensive text guides readers through issues particularly relevant to occupational therapy in schools, such as RtI and positive behavioral supports, 504 plans, IEPs, and students’ rights and eligibility for occupational therapy services under relevant laws such as IDEA.
 
Destined to become an occupational therapy classic, Best Practices for Occupational Therapy in Schools is the most comprehensive publication available for practice in schools.  
 
May 2016
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Behavior Solutions for the Inclusive Classroom: A Handy Reference Guide that Explains Behaviors Associated with Autism, Asperger's, ADHD, Sensory Processing Disorder, and other Special Needs
By Beth Aune, Beth Burt, Peter Gennaro
Recommended by CB, OTR, Katy Independent School District
 
     Synopsis:
As inclusion becomes the norm in general education, teachers are faced with behaviors they have never seen before. Special needs educators may recognize the telltale symptom of a sensory need or a textbook-case of an avoidance behavior, but this is all new territory for the general-ed crowd!
 
    Written by Director of Special Education Peter Gennaro, occupational therapist Beth Aune, and special needs mom and advocate Beth Burt, this book illuminates possible causes of those mysterious behaviors, and more importantly, provides solutions!   Teachers can quickly look up an in-the-moment solution and learn about what the child is communicating, and why.
 
April 2016
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 The Special Needs School Survival Guide
by Cara Koscinski
Recommended by MW, OTR, Houston Independent School District
 
      Synopsis:
A Family Choice Award Winner for 2015, The Special Needs School Survival Guide is a handbook for anyone teaching, living with, homeschooling, or working with students who have: autism, Sensory Processing Disorder, ADHD, learning disabilities, behavioral concerns, handwriting difficulty, fine motor delays, trouble with transitions, homework concerns, dyslexia, dysgraphia, and more! It contains an easy to read Q&A format.   Every section answers common questions teachers, parents, and homeschoolers ask about teaching a student who has special needs. The "Out of the POCKET" activities are specially designed to be carried out easily in either a group setting or individually. Included are facts on Individual Education Plans; 504 plans; classroom modifications; accommodations for all types of students and disabilities; behavior issues; transitions; ADLs; handwriting; cutting; gym class; sensory rooms and sensory accommodations galore; ADHD and attention; dysgraphia; dyscalculia; dyslexia; warm-up and cool-down activities for classroom use and so much more! This book is written by a pediatric occupational therapist who is also the homeschooling mother to two children with autism and Sensory Processing Disorder. It will be an invaluable reference for parents, caregivers, teachers, students, classroom aides, school districts, therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, physical therapists, special needs teachers, psychologists, physicians, principals, and teaching assistants. The Special Needs SCHOOL Survival Guide will be a "go-to" resource that you'll refer to time and time again!